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Trump on Nuclear War
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: January 09, 2017 11:07PM

Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM



In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.
Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM

Bryce Vickmark/ZUMA; RomoloTavani/iStock; photoillustration by Ivylise Simones

In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.
Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM

Bryce Vickmark/ZUMA; RomoloTavani/iStock; photoillustration by Ivylise Simones

In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.
Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM

Bryce Vickmark/ZUMA; RomoloTavani/iStock; photoillustration by Ivylise Simones

In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.
Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM

Bryce Vickmark/ZUMA; RomoloTavani/iStock; photoillustration by Ivylise Simones

In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.
Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM

Bryce Vickmark/ZUMA; RomoloTavani/iStock; photoillustration by Ivylise Simones

In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.
Does Donald Trump Believe Nuclear War Is Inevitable?
The man about to take control of US nukes has a very fatalistic view.

David CornDec. 8, 2016 6:00 AM

Bryce Vickmark/ZUMA; RomoloTavani/iStock; photoillustration by Ivylise Simones

In just seven weeks, a man known for being ill-tempered, thin-skinned, narcissistic, and erratic will take control of the US nuclear arsenal. Donald Trump will have the authority and power to launch any combination of the country's 4,500 nuclear weapons. At any time and for any reason he deems fit, Trump could destroy a nation and, through miscalculation, the world.

During the presidential campaign, he uttered several troubling statements about nuclear arms. At a Republican primary debate, he botched a question about the nuclear triad—America's system of sea-, air-, and land-based nuclear weapons—suggesting he did not understand the most basic information about the structure of the US nuclear command. (He babbled, "For me, nuclear is just the power, the devastation is very important to me."winking smiley At other points in the campaign, Trump noted he would support allowing Japan, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia to obtain nuclear weapons and indicated he would be open to using such weapons against ISIS and in other conflicts.

What makes Trump's loose talk—and ignorance—about nuclear weapons particularly worrisome is that in the past, he has taken a fatalistic approach toward the notion of nuclear war. He has spoken as if he believed such a conflagration was almost inevitable. And now he is about to become one of the few humans on the planet who can decide the fate of the Earth.

Trump's fatalism regarding nuclear war goes back decades. During a 1990 interview with Playboy, he was asked about running for president (yes, even then) and to describe what "would be some of President Trump's longer-term views of the future." Trump replied, "I think of the future, but I refuse to paint it. Anything can happen. But I often think of nuclear war."

The interviewer, Glenn Plaskin, seemed surprise. "Nuclear war?" he asked. Trump explained:

I've always thought about the issue of nuclear war; it's a very important element in my thought process. It's the ultimate, the ultimate catastrophe, the biggest problem this world has, and nobody's focusing on the nuts and bolts of it. It's a little like sickness. People don't believe they're going to get sick until they do. Nobody wants to talk about it. I believe the greatest of all stupidities is people's believing it will never happen, because everybody knows how destructive it will be, so nobody uses weapons. What bullshit.

Plaskin asked, "Does any of that fuzzy thinking exist around the Trump office?" The mogul replied:

On a much lower level, I would never hire anybody who thinks that way, because he has absolutely no common sense. He's living in a world of make-believe. It's like thinking the Titanic can't sink. Too many countries have nuclear weapons; nobody knows where they're all pointed, what button it takes to launch them.

ACTIVE or RadioActive--DISRUPT20 DC or your hometown.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/09/2017 11:10PM by riverhousebill.

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