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I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 03, 2017 04:14AM

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I love my undocumented people. I love us because everyday we wake up to a country that hates us. We wake up, give thanks to god and go to work. We come home watch the news, hear how our own TVs deme us criminals, we change the channel and pray that tomorrow will be a better day for us. When they give us a little breathing room like DACA we make the most of it. We are so grateful that often we forget we deserve better. We stay low on the radar because we want peace, want to exist without the added stress of having to be public about where our spirits ache.


We just want to work to feed our families and yet we become the scapegoats to a system that is addicted to exploiting the poor. I love my undocumented people because the way our spirits are toyed with you need some unfathomable strength. I love my undocumented people because we have constantly have had to prove our humanity and we have constantly done it beautifully because to stay human under these conditions you have had to have an understanding of beauty.

I love us even when our stories are manipulated and exploited. I love us because at the end of the day somehow we always manage to make something out of nothing. There is nothing beautiful about being undocumented, nothing at all but y'all mothafukas help me know that no matter how the this country breaks I know strength and strive

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 03, 2017 09:50AM

Poem by Yosimar Reyes, a Los Angeles-based poet and undocumented immigrant originally from Guerreo, Mexico.

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: RawPracticalist ()
Date: September 04, 2017 07:16AM

The poem author should be undocumented, not revealed, no name, no address.

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 04, 2017 11:17AM

Quote
RawPracticalist
The poem author should be undocumented, not revealed, no name, no address.

Thats realy digusting Rawpracicalist, If it was not for undocumented explioted labor your produce bill would be five fold.

This is what is what Rawpracicalist-I think anti-immigrant racism has become a politically acceptable substitute for racism that is overtly based on skin color. Most white Americans today would hotly deny being "racist" - they would say that "skin color doesn't matter." But they have no trouble being "anti-immigrant" - because, they say, "immigrants broke the law!" It's a new rationale for legal discrimination against people of color.


Mark Karlin interviewed Aviva Chomsky, a professor and coordinator of Latin American studies at Salem State University in Massachusetts, about the issues raised in Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal.

Mark Karlin: You write that a key factor in immigration becoming illegal (for many persons of color, particularly from Mexico and Latin America) is the development of a two-track parallel system of labor in the United States? Can you briefly explain?

Aviva Chomsky: As I argue in the book, illegality is one way that is currently used to keep a significant portion of the country's population in second-class status. Different methods have been used over time, but if you look at any moment in US history, there has been some legal method of disenfranchising part of the population, and maintaining them as a cheap labor force. Past systems include slavery and racial discrimination. It's very convenient for employers to have access to disenfranchised workers, and it's also convenient in some ways for citizens in general - it helps citizens have access to cheap food, cheap goods, cheap services, all produced by people who don't enjoy the same rights that citizens do. (Of course there are downsides for citizens too - but we need to be clear that the problem is the system that exploits people, and not blame the people who are being exploited.) Illegality as a system of enforcing this unequal labor market really rose to the fore after 1965 and especially after 1986, with two immigration "reforms" that made Mexican workers "illegal" (1965) and then made it specifically illegal for them to work (1986), thus increasing their vulnerability in the labor market.

Your book details the historical development of immigration law, with a benchmark year being 1965. Why was that year a threshold that "progressively restricted the rights of noncitizens"? Why was that year so important as a dividing point?

[The year] 1965 was when the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) was passed. The 1965 law dismantled the system of national origins quotas that had been implemented in 1921. The 1921 law explicitly sought to maintain what Congress felt was the appropriate racial and national balance of the US population by restricting the large immigration from southern and eastern Europe that had occurred in the previous decades. It looked back in time to a period when the US supposedly had the "correct" racial-ethnic composition, and set quotas for the different European countries based on their proportion in the population. Non-Europeans basically didn't get quotas at all. "Asians" were already excluded because they were considered to be "racially ineligible to citizenship." The law was based on and strengthened the assumption that the United States was meant to be a white country - but it went further than that to rank Europeans into more and less desirable citizens.

The 1965 Act responded to the post-World War II climate of rejection of overt racial discrimination. It set up a uniform quota system, giving every "country" in the world a quota of about 20,000 immigrant visas per year. I put "country" in quotes because we need to think about what this means, in 1965. Most of Africa was colonized, so did not get any quotas. Europe happens to be made up of many tiny countries. So despite looking non-discriminatory on paper, the system of 20,000 per country actually was a way of continuing to privilege European immigration.

The INA drastically changed the way Mexicans were treated under US immigration law. Prior to 1965, there were no restrictions on immigration from the Western Hemisphere. Every restrictive immigration law that was passed made an exception for Mexicans - because employers needed their labor. Now, in the name of treating all countries equally, the 20,000 per year quota was also imposed on Western Hemisphere countries - which basically meant Mexico, the only Western Hemisphere country that was sending large numbers of migrants to the US. At the same time, other laws including civil rights legislation and the abolition of the Bracero Program also made it harder to discriminate against workers on the basis of race in the post-war period. So now, suddenly, with the abolition of the Bracero Program and the imposition of the quota, those Mexicans who had been crossing the border to work, and being recruited and welcomed into the country, were suddenly turned into "illegal" people. So there was a new legal justification for discrimination and exploitation, one more suitable for the times.

The United States was founded by white immigrants to North America who displaced Native Americans, and was a nation pretty much wide open to white immigration from Europe during its post-independence and industrial expansion eras. From the perspective of many white US citizens, how much does racial and ethnic prejudice against people of color from Mexico and Central America play a role in the hyper-state of fear and resentment against them coming to the United States

However, the US business community, under both Bush and Obama, has been pushing for a guest worker program in order to ensure a steady supply of inexpensive labor. They have been frustrated by the end of the Bracero Program a few decades ago and feel the current H-2 visa quota does not provide a sufficient low wage labor force. An August 29 Wall Street Journal article reports, "Mr. Obama is also considering changes requested by business groups to make more visas available for legal immigration, people familiar with White House deliberations have said." Even Bush was backing immigration "reform" that would supply a cheap labor force to business. Despite the populist right-wing political appeal to anti-immigration sentiment, many in the business wing of both parties wants more visas for Mexicans and Latin Americans because they will, of necessity, generally work for less and demand fewer benefits and work for longer hours. Of course, visas without citizenship provides work without the guarantee of human rights or protections. Is that correct?

Yes, I think any kind of guest-worker program that allows people to come to the country to work but deprives them of full civil, legal and human rights, is a recipe for inequality and discrimination. If we want to claim to treat people equally, then we can't create legal exceptions to allow some people to be more equal than others.

Can you briefly explain, as you did in a recent commentary on TomDisptach.com, how a sensationalist outburst in the media and politically about the alleged crisis of a massive invasion of children immigrants across the Mexico border symbolizes a national xenophobic hysteria?

Central American youth have been crossing the border in increasing numbers for the past several years. But the story that appeared in the news was placed and promoted by the anti-Obama, anti-immigrant right wing, with the spin that it was Obama's supposedly lenient policies towards immigrant youth that had caused what was frequently called a "surge." Unfortunately instead of looking at the roots of the problem, the Democrats turned it into a humanitarian sound bite: "poor children!"

You also write in your TomDisptach.com commentary, "In other words, the policies that led to the present 'crisis' were promoted over the decades with similar degrees of enthusiasm by Republicans and Democrats." In addition, you emphasize that both parties are to blame for perpetuating narratives that avoid the reality of immigration issues regarding our southern neighbors. What is your response to Democrats that it is the Republicans who are keeping the "problem" from being resolved?

The Democrats are correct that the Republicans are blocking a "comprehensive immigration reform" in Congress. They are incorrect in implying that what they are calling a comprehensive immigration reform will solve the problem. The model that the Democrats are pushing is very similar to the reform that Reagan signed in 1986: create a path to legalization for some undocumented people, and increase criminalization for others, while further militarizing the border. It did not solve the "problem" in 1986 and it will not solve the problem now.

In Chapter 6, you talk about some of the contradictions in US policy toward undocumented children. Can you expand on that?

Some laws, and some federal and state agencies, protect the rights of children. Other laws criminalize and penalize the undocumented. Since many children are undocumented, or have parents who are undocumented, these laws end up contradicting each other. It's important to remember that undocumentedness is a status created by our laws. Our laws place people in that status. For adults, it's justified by the rhetoric of criminalization. For children, it's harder to rely on that rhetoric to justify discrimination and persecution.

On page 101, you cite that the immigration enforcement and detention system cost a staggering $74 billion in 2011 and employs 800,000 people. Obviously, this creates an economic constituency, including the prison system, to keep current policies in force, doesn't it?

Yes, it absolutely does. And the private prison system - which has increasingly come to house immigrant detainees - has fought hard to keep the criminalization in place. But struggling localities and local officials have also lobbied for detention centers. It's a growth industry, and it provides jobs. Immigrant detainees are considered to be desirable detainees (for people who are invested in the prison industry) because they tend to be young and in good health, and not violent - they're cheaper to care for than the general prison population. That's why the private prison companies make such a profit off of them.

I was touched by your poignant reference to the Woody Guthrie song that lamented the plight of "deportees" who had worked in the Bracero Program and died in a plane crash in California (at the time it was written): "Is this the best way we can grow our big orchards? / Is this the best way we can grow our good fruit?" Why has the agricultural sector in the United States long been an exploiter of the Bracero Program, undocumented and H-2 workers?

The agricultural sector has been an exploiter because our agricultural system has developed in a completely unsustainable way, over several centuries. It's been based on huge federal subsidies, huge fossil fuel inputs, depleting aquifers, and exploiting cheap migrant labor - in order to make a profit, and to provide cheap food that historically allowed other industries to pay low wages, and allows us to be one of the most obese countries on the planet. It's based on producing as much as possible at the lowest cost possible, and demanding and receiving federal support in the form of subsidies and legal protections to do so.

Your last chapter offers a large number of solutions to the travesty of US immigration policy toward Mexico and Central America. Do you think that any of them can make it through the sensationalism and racial bias that currently exists in the United States?

No. I think that we can work for some tweaking of the system - like the "Morton Memos" that instructed ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] to exercise "prosecutorial discretion" and stop deporting people who are not violent criminals or a threat to national security, or Obama's signature Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that gives temporary relief from deportation to some undocumented youth. If the Morton Memos were to actually be enforced I think it would create a dramatically improved climate for human rights and equality for undocumented people. Unfortunately they have not been enforced and deportation continues to be the Obama administration's default mode of operation.

I think that citizens and policy makers need to face up to how our history, our economy, our laws and our social structures created undocumentedness as a way of legitimating inequality. We need to decide once and for all that we do not want to sustain a society based on differences in status - that all people should be treated equally. Then we can have a real immigration reform.
Copyright, Truthout. May not be reprinted without permission.
I think anti-immigrant racism has become a politically acceptable substitute for racism that is overtly based on skin color. Most white Americans today would hotly deny being "racist" - they would say that "skin color doesn't matter." But they have no trouble being "anti-immigrant" - because, they say, "immigrants broke the law!" It's a new rationale for legal discrimination against people of color.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/04/2017 11:22AM by riverhousebill.

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: RawPracticalist ()
Date: September 04, 2017 02:47PM

I will not even read your full comment because it is not what I meant.
I was trying to write on the same line of what he wrote.

The poem author should not be known like the undocumented.
On the run, a person who may be deported anytime.

I guess there will be a time when the land on this earth is free and for all of us like the air is. They cannot fight over the air because they cannot partitioned it.

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 04, 2017 03:03PM

Quote
RawPracticalist
I will not even read your full comment because it is not what I meant.
I was trying to write on the same line of what he wrote.

The poem author should not be known like the undocumented.
On the run, a person who may be deported anytime.

I guess there will be a time when the land on this earth is free and for all of us like the air is. They cannot fight over the air because they cannot partitioned it.

If thats not what you meant Im sorry for misunderstanding, I guess I missed point then.

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: RawPracticalist ()
Date: September 05, 2017 08:38PM

Someone posted




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/05/2017 08:39PM by RawPracticalist.

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 06, 2017 01:33AM

To do this to children junking Daca is a form of terrorism. Trump is a very sick person. I hope his days as dictator will be over soon and the nation might heal some from damage done by this madman.
Dont know about others but he is not my president!

Because THIS is a Revolution!” A Slam Poem

Posted on November 26, 2010 by IYJL


“Because THIS is a Revolution!” A slam poem by Jorge

I didn’t have to run across the border to know that as much as I love her.
America does not love me back.
And as much as I want to succeed, she won’t let me.

My mother brought me here when she was 27
My sister was 3, and I was 8.

She figured an American education for her children would fit well with her job
cleaning offices afterhours and my father’s machismo.

She is now 43.
It’s been 16 years.

Learning English through Goosebumps books in 3rd grade in Tejas,
I sat with other classmates whose skin was darker but accents were just as thick.

You could smell the residue of the rancho still on their worn shoes.
And the excitement of being somewhere where wearing Nikes wasn’t a big deal.

Pokemon trading cards.
And McDonald’s taught me lessons on capitalism and globalization.

Yet, a broken, no – shattered, immigration system holds me back.
As I try to piece my identity together I struggle to find the pieces.
Jagged and rough,
I can’t glue something together when parts are in Mexico and I can’t find the piece
reading, “American” being held by those who don’t care to acknowledge their
privilege!

I learned.

I learned that my accent would soon be gone. Replaced by Chicago.
And that being undocumented means you cannot attend college no matter how hard
you work.

It means if you graduate, a bachelor’s degree is a piece of a paper. Skills blown to the
wind.

Mom. This is for you.
I blamed you because I didn’t know who else to blame.
I’m sorry.

It’s not your fault I feel ashamed that I cannot attain a license in to drive you to the
grocery store.

My mother moved to the U.S. because she figured an American diploma would fit
well with her dry-cleaning job and a sense of loneliness.

Yet, “illegals” or alien are names pressed upon us.

Last time I checked, “illegal” is not a noun describing a person.
And last time I checked,
My tax dollars are just as valuable as yours.

I can’t exempt myself from not paying taxes whenever I buy something.

I had to learn where acentos van just like you did.
Spanglish is my culture.
Chilaquiles and apple pie is my meal.

Go back? What do you mean go back?
My ancestors have worked hard at building this country.
And NAFTA is not just a document, it is a reality.

High school kids should not be weeping because college dreams are crushed.
When 65,000 DREAMs are denied a year, there is something wrong.

One of my journal entries begins with, “I cried last night. And I try to be strong for
my family but I couldn’t.”

Breakdowns break me down.

My friend who’s been here since he was one deserves his DREAM.
Mi amiga que quiere estudiar se lo merece.
I know you feel like giving up, but I won’t let you.
Our feeling of wanting to travel becomes a push.
Pumping our fist.
Because we live in America.

Because THIS is a revolution!

When 65,000 DREAMs are denied a year, there is something wrong.

Because being undocumented feels like your young forever.
And there is no list for me to sign my name at the bottom. So that I can grow up.

I speak English just as well as you do and I understand that you’re afraid of change.

But I am not leaving

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: RawPracticalist ()
Date: September 07, 2017 04:47PM

Sarah Sanders: '95 percent of what the president says is not a lie'
[www.yahoo.com]

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 07, 2017 08:28PM

The View’s Joy Behar told White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders that she “feels sorry for” her for having to speak for President Trump.

Behar claimed on Wednesday’s show that a Politifact report shows that Trump lies 95 percent of the time, but Behar’s citation was incorrect. The Politifact report actually states that 95 of the 158 total claims they checked out were “false” or “pants on fire.” When including “mostly false” ratings, Trump’s “lie percentage” stands at 78 percent, not 95.

“The problem with that, Joy, is that you are doing exactly what we are talking about and pushing a false narrative,” Sanders shot back.

“I feel for you,” Behar said, reiterating her false claim that Trump only tells the truth 5 percent of the time. “I feel sorry for you that you have to go out and defend those lies every day.”



Sanders again said she disagreed with the report and that the media pushing false narratives “inhibit the president’s ability to succeed…his success is America’s success.”

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Re: I love my undocumented people
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: September 07, 2017 08:33PM

The Memory Hole

Supplying alternative facts is one way of destroying memory. Erasing real facts is another.

In Orwell’s 1984, there was a slot in the wall at the Ministry of Truth where Winston Smith worked, a memory hole, into which inconvenient documents could be fed to be consumed forever by a huge basement furnace. There are, it seems, plenty of memory holes in Washington these days.

Since January, the Trump administration has been systematically removing from federal websites inconvenient information on subjects as diverse as climate change and occupational health and safety, and replacing it with anodyne messages.
***
What happens when a lie hits your brain? The now-standard model was first proposed by Harvard University psychologist Daniel Gilbert more than 20 years ago. Gilbert argues that people see the world in two steps. First, even just briefly, we hold the lie as true: We must accept something in order to understand it. For instance, if someone were to tell us—hypothetically, of course—that there had been serious voter fraud in Virginia during the presidential election, we must for a fraction of a second accept that fraud did, in fact, take place. Only then do we take the second step, either completing the mental certification process (yes, fraud!) or rejecting it (what? no way). Unfortunately, while the first step is a natural part of thinking—it happens automatically and effortlessly—the second step can be easily disrupted. It takes work: We must actively choose to accept or reject each statement we hear. In certain circumstances, that verification simply fails to take place. As Gilbert writes, human minds, “when faced with shortages of time, energy, or conclusive evidence, may fail to unaccept the ideas that they involuntarily accept during comprehension.”


When we are overwhelmed with false, or potentially false, statements, our brains pretty quickly become so overworked that we stop trying to sift through everything.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/07/2017 08:41PM by riverhousebill.

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