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“Making this memo public
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: February 03, 2018 08:32AM

Wray on the memo


“Making this memo public will almost certainly impede our ability to conduct clandestine activities operating outside any legal or judicial system on an international scale.”
According to the article, Wray noted “that it was essential that mutual trust exist between the American people and the vast, mysterious cabal given free rein to use any tactics necessary to conduct surveillance on U.S. citizens or subvert religious and political groups.”


“If we take away the people’s faith in this shadowy monolith exempt from any consequences, all that’s left is an extensive network of rogue, unelected intelligence officers carrying out extrajudicial missions for a variety of subjective, and occasionally personal, reasons,” The Onion quoted Wray as saying.
The article concluded:
“At press time, Wray confirmed the massive, unaccountable government secret agencies were unaware of any wrongdoing for violating constitutional rights.”



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/03/2018 08:38AM by riverhousebill.

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Re: “Making this memo public
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: February 06, 2018 03:24AM

Show me yours and Ill show you mine Trumpkins


The Times Asks Court to Unseal Documents on Surveillance of Carter Page


(HUFFINGTONPOST)
By CHARLIE SAVAGE and ADAM GOLDMANFEB. 5, 2018




A memo written by Republican congressional aides disclosed that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court approved surveillance targeting Carter Page, a former Trump campaign adviser, in October 2016.Credit Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters
WASHINGTON — The New York Times is asking the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to unseal secret documents related to the wiretapping of Carter Page, the onetime Trump campaign adviser at the center of a disputed memo written by Republican staffers on the House Intelligence Committee.

The motion is unusual. No such wiretapping application materials apparently have become public since Congress first enacted the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in 1978. That law regulates electronic spying on domestic soil — the interception of phone calls and emails — undertaken in the name of monitoring suspected spies and terrorists, as opposed to wiretapping for investigating ordinary criminal suspects.

Normally, even the existence of such material is a closely guarded secret. While applications for criminal wiretaps often eventually become public, the government has refused to disclose the contents of applications for intelligence wiretaps — even to defendants who are later prosecuted on the basis of information derived from them.

But President Trump lowered the shield of secrecy surrounding such materials on Friday by declassifying the Republican memo about Mr. Page, after finding that the public interest in disclosing its contents outweighed any need to protect the information. Because Mr. Trump did so, The Times argues, there is no longer a justification “for the Page warrant orders and application materials to be withheld in their entirety,” and “disclosure would serve the public interest.”





The Republican memo acknowledged that the intelligence court had approved surveillance targeting Mr. Page in October 2016 and later approved three applications for 90-day extensions, meaning he was observed for at least a year under the warrant. The memo named the officials who signed off on the applications and described purported claims and purported omissions in those materials.
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The central claim of the Republican memo, which was drafted under the direction of Representative Devin Nunes of California, the Republican chairman of the Intelligence Committee, is that law enforcement officials running the early stages of the investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and possible links to the Trump campaign abused their surveillance authorities and misled the court.

The memo contends that the application used material gathered by Christopher Steele, a former British intelligence agent, without disclosing to the court that the Democratic National Committee and the Hillary Clinton campaign financed his work as opposition research. The implication is that judges who approved the wiretapping did not know it might be biased and were thus misled about its credibility.

But the credibility of the accusations in the memo are themselves the subject of intense dispute. Democrats who have seen the underlying materials say the Republican memo contains serious material inaccuracies and omissions, such as failing to include unrelated evidence about Mr. Page and Russia that the court also saw and mischaracterizing other facts.


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For example, Democrats say that the FISA judges were, in fact, told that the financing of Mr. Steele’s research was politically motivated, even if the funders were not identified by name.

They have produced their own, still-classified rebuttal memo, but the Republican majority on the House Intelligence Committee voted against making it public at the same time as their own memo.

Democrats are still pushing to make its contents public and the committee voted on Monday to do so, but it is not clear whether Mr. Trump will permit that to happen. If he objects, the full Republican-controlled Congress would then vote on whether to release the document.

“Given the overwhelming public interest in assessing the accuracy of the Nunes memorandum and knowing the actual basis for the Page surveillance orders,” The Times’s motion says, the court should direct the publication of its orders and the application materials "with only such limited redactions as may be essential to preserve information that remains properly classified notwithstanding the declassification and dissemination of the Nunes memorandum."

The Times sent the motion and related documents to the Justice Department on Monday to commence the action. It also submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the Justice Department on Friday asking the executive branch to disclose, following a declassification review, the same materials about the wiretapping of Mr. Page, who had left the Trump campaign a month before the government applied to wiretap him.

That request is not yet ripe for litigation. Separately, a USA Today reporter and the James Madison Project, an anti-secrecy organization, are pursuing a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, filed last spring, asking the executive branch to disclose any FISA wiretap orders or applications targeting the Trump Organization, the Trump campaign, Mr. Trump or people associated with him.





In the motion asking the intelligence court to unseal the Page materials, The Times is being represented in part by the Yale Law School Media Freedom & Information Access Clinic.



On Twitter, follow Charlie Savage @charlie_savage

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Re: “Making this memo public
Posted by: Prana ()
Date: February 06, 2018 03:57PM

Quote
riverhousebill
Wray on the memo


“Making this memo public will almost certainly impede our ability to conduct clandestine activities operating outside any legal or judicial system on an international scale.”
According to the article, Wray noted “that it was essential that mutual trust exist between the American people and the vast, mysterious cabal given free rein to use any tactics necessary to conduct surveillance on U.S. citizens or subvert religious and political groups.”


“If we take away the people’s faith in this shadowy monolith exempt from any consequences, all that’s left is an extensive network of rogue, unelected intelligence officers carrying out extrajudicial missions for a variety of subjective, and occasionally personal, reasons,” The Onion quoted Wray as saying.
The article concluded:
“At press time, Wray confirmed the massive, unaccountable government secret agencies were unaware of any wrongdoing for violating constitutional rights.”

What’s interesting about this Onion article is that it is meant as satire and its intent is to be funny, but in fact these points are absolutely true.
FBI Warns Republican Memo Could Undermine Faith In Massive, Unaccountable Government Secret Agencies


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Re: “Making this memo public
Posted by: Prana ()
Date: February 06, 2018 04:06PM


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Re: “Making this memo public
Posted by: Jennifer ()
Date: February 07, 2018 09:21PM

Although I was looking up other sources for this info, and some news sites - like The Daily Caller, I can't remember the others - say it's not true that Carter Page worked for the FBI.

Was Carter Page An Undercover FBI Informant?

[dailycaller.com]

Did Carter Page Help Bust a Russian Spy Ring as an Undercover FBI Employee?

[www.redstate.com]

DOJ Documents Show Carter Page Helped FBI Catch Russian Spies

[townhall.com]

*********

Here's the Carter Page interview with Laura Ingraham -

[insider.foxnews.com]

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Re: “Making this memo public
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: February 10, 2018 03:09AM

Rep. Jamie Raskin

Time for all the Fox News-injected government transparency advocates and diehard Russian Trolls to recycle their "Release the Memo" propaganda!

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