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Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: rzman10001 ()
Date: November 16, 2011 06:22PM

Does anyone know where I could get Sprouted Chia Seed Powder cheaper than I am now. Sunfood is charging 8.62 to ship it to me and I am not making much money right now. I would like to get the shipping cost down a little. This is a specialty product though so maybe I should'nt expect to get it cheaper, thanks Chris.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: EddieOrso ()
Date: November 17, 2011 06:45AM

I would sprout them yourself! It's really easy actually.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Anonymous User ()
Date: November 17, 2011 08:08AM

You'd need a dehydrator and a high powered blender to process them, vacuum sealing equipment would be a benefit as well. In the long term that may be a cost saver but it's going to require an investment of quite a bit of money.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: suncloud ()
Date: November 18, 2011 05:48PM

I'm not sure if there's a real benefit to sprouting chia seeds and then drying them.

My understanding is: The purpose of soaking nuts and seeds is to neutralize inhibitors and other potential toxins. The purpose of drying afterwards is for storage and for bringing back the "crunch" after soaking (like for an almond or brazil nut). Since chia is easy to soak already, and since there's no reason to bring back the crunch if a person is just going to soak it again anyway, I don't see the benefit of paying extra to buy it soaked and redried.

Does anyone know?

A person can always soak it whole and then blend it. You'd end up with about the same thing as if you added the powder to water, except that (I would think) the blended whole seed would be fresher and probably retain more nutrients.

Maybe the powder would be more convenient for sprinkling onto a salad, but it doesn't have a flavor.

When chia is placed in water, the gel is released very quickly. Within 1/2 hour, the seeds are swollen in the water. The gel is highly viscous, which is beneficial for reducing blood cholesterol levels and lowering the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

According to SproutPeople, chia is "muciligous" and that effects the way they're sprouted:

Mucilaginous
1. Resembling mucilage; moist and sticky. 2. Relating to or secreting mucilage. In sprouting: A seed which has a hull that when water is contacted, absorbs that water and turns into a "gel-sack". Usually slippery, these seeds can NOT grow by traditional water-only sprouting methods. They may be grown if mixed with an appropriate percentage of non-mucilaginous seeds (French Garden, Italian Blend, Nick's Hot Sprout Salad). To grow them alone they must be planted on a growing medium and harvested as Greens (Micro-Greens).

Mucilaginous seeds include: Arugula, Basil, Chia, Cress, Flax and (some) Mustards (not ours).

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So, if chia seeds are being sprouted without other seeds in the mix, the sprouts are harvested as greens, not as dried seeds (according to SproutPeople).

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Anonymous User ()
Date: November 18, 2011 06:19PM

I would rather have whole chia than the green sprouts, sprouted they aren't any better than alfalfa, as seeds they are quite nutritious though. Seed and baby plant are two very different things.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Date: November 19, 2011 10:36AM

suncloud Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I'm not sure if there's a real benefit to
> sprouting chia seeds and then drying them.
>


There is a huge benefit from sprouting and then drying properly. You get a greater availability of minerals, a far greater increase in vitamins, an increase in enzymes and hormones and a greater electromagnetic frequency (chi). The sprouted seed is at least 10 times as nutrious as the original seed and the omega 3 in sprouted chia is 36 times more available than the original seed. Some of the B vitamins have increased up to 3,000%, the vitamin E might even be increased as much as 600%, the calcium would have increased at least 200%, the zinc levels would have increased, the concentrated protein has dramatically reduced but the overall amino acid count would have increased (a much safer way to eat the chia) and the oxalic acid has been taken out by sprouting (even soaking doesn't remove it because it is still in the gel water). l could go on and on about how good sprouting chia seeds is. Chia should always be sprouted and never eaten soaked or in dry unsprouted form. Sprouting is essential in this day and age.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Date: November 19, 2011 10:47AM

coco Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I would rather have whole chia than the green
> sprouts, sprouted they aren't any better than
> alfalfa, as seeds they are quite nutritious
> though. Seed and baby plant are two very different
> things.

Please don't say that, that is a very poor trade off. The nutrition of alfalfa might seem less impressive on paper, but that is because the increased weight/water of the sprout makes the plant look less nutritious, but this couldn't be further from the truth. lf you dehydrated the sprouted alfalfa and compared it to the original dry seed you would notice a huge difference. You would observe a 400% zinc increase, some B vitamins being up to 30 times the original levels, huge vitamin E increases etc. The plant becomes a super nutritious plant and all the concentrated nutrients become predigested and much easier used by the body. The changes during sprouting are so amazing that l can't even begin to tell you how great it is. l could write 100 pages on how great sprouting is...nothing touches it.

Sprouts are the most nutritious land foods of all by far!!! But you say to me that the original seed is much more nutritious than the sprouted seed, right? Wrong! l will try to spend more time explaining this in time.

The trick to getting all the mega nutrition is to sprout the seeds for optimal times. lf you sprout too long it gets too bulky and is tough to eat it all, but undersprouting doesn't get rid of all the toxins.

One day l will post a proper article explaining the greatness of sprouting because it is a very misunderstood subject.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Anonymous User ()
Date: November 19, 2011 12:00PM

I managed a spout house and living foods resource centre for a couple of years, I know all about nutritional benefits. My point is that chia sprouts, as in sprouted to green leaf stage, are not as nutritionally dense as whole seeds or seeds that have been soaked until gelled. The omega fatty acids are not present in the green leaf stage. I think we may not be using the word "sprouted" to mean the same thing here.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Date: November 19, 2011 12:24PM

coco Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> My point is that chia
> sprouts, as in sprouted to green leaf stage, are
> not as nutritionally dense as whole seeds or seeds
> that have been soaked until gelled. The omega
> fatty acids are not present in the green leaf
> stage. I think we may not be using the word
> "sprouted" to mean the same thing here.

Yes, the green chia leaves are not as dense because of the high water content, it just means that more of the sprout must be consumed.

The fat content of sprouted chia goes way down becuase it is high in fatty acids. (Fatty acids are just predigested fats).

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: suncloud ()
Date: November 19, 2011 05:50PM

From SproutarianMan:

"The sprouted seed is at least 10 times as nutrious as the original seed and the omega 3 in sprouted chia is 36 times more available than the original seed. Some of the B vitamins have increased up to 3,000%, the vitamin E might even be increased as much as 600%, the calcium would have increased at least 200%, the zinc levels would have increased, the concentrated protein has dramatically reduced but the overall amino acid count would have increased (a much safer way to eat the chia) and the oxalic acid has been taken out by sprouting (even soaking doesn't remove it because it is still in the gel water)."

Would you happen to have a reference for those figures? Also, do you have a reference confirming that chia contains oxalic acid?

I'm assuming those figures are for the sprouted/dried chia seed compared to the unsoaked chia seeds. Could you clarify, and if so, do you happen to know the figures for the soaked chia seeds?

Also, for how long would you sprout chia seeds, and what is the procedure? Do you somehow rinse off the gel during sprouting? Or does the gel get dried along with the seed? My understanding is that the gel itself is very beneficial. Would that be lost in the process?

Do you think there would be a nutritional benefit to drying the sprouted seed after it's sprouted (besides have the sprouted seed in a more concentrated form of course)?

Thanks!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/19/2011 05:56PM by suncloud.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Date: November 20, 2011 01:13AM

suncloud Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> From SproutarianMan:
>
> "The sprouted seed is at least 10 times as
> nutrious as the original seed and the omega 3 in
> sprouted chia is 36 times more available than the
> original seed. Some of the B vitamins have
> increased up to 3,000%, the vitamin E might even
> be increased as much as 600%, the calcium would
> have increased at least 200%, the zinc levels
> would have increased, the concentrated protein has
> dramatically reduced but the overall amino acid
> count would have increased (a much safer way to
> eat the chia) and the oxalic acid has been taken
> out by sprouting (even soaking doesn't remove it
> because it is still in the gel water)."
>
> Would you happen to have a reference for those
> figures?
Let me start by correcting something l said yesterday. l actually made an eror here. The chia seeds are not at least ten times as nutritious as the original seed (however it could be close in my opinion) however it has been scientifically found that sprouted chia is at least 10 times as nutritious as some of the best dark green leafy vegetables picked straight from the garden. The source of this is from the world nenowned bioenergetic doctor and pioneeer Dr Valerie Hunt who did testing at UCLA.

Also, do you have a reference confirming
> that chia contains oxalic acid?
>

l'll have to check that for you another time, l can't think of the reference off hand.


> I'm assuming those figures are for the
> sprouted/dried chia seed compared to the unsoaked
> chia seeds. Could you clarify, and if so, do you
> happen to know the figures for the soaked chia
> seeds?

Those figures are my general observation of average increases in vitamins and minerals for many sprouted foods across the board, that's why l say things like some B vitamins increasing up to 3,000%, and vitamin E increasing as much as 600% etc. Some plants have zinc increase 200%, but others like alfalfa have zinc increase 400%. l get this information from various books l own, so yes, there is a general pattern here.

l am not sure about the figures of soaked chia seed, but their would be a massive increase in bacteria and enzymes at least, but most likely not such a big change in vitamins and minerals.
>

> Also, for how long would you sprout chia seeds,
> and what is the procedure? Do you somehow rinse
> off the gel during sprouting? Or does the gel get
> dried along with the seed? My understanding is
> that the gel itself is very beneficial. Would
> that be lost in the process?

Depends on the weather, but l generally sprout them for 14 days. l soak them for 6 hours and then spread them out evenly on a cloth laid over a tray. l then spray with a fine mist of filtered energised water twice a day. l then harvest and eat or juice. They grow into beautiful full rich bright green plants that look like a beautiful lawn from a distance. Well worth prparing and one of the greatest foods available to mankind. The dry seed is good, but the sprouted variety is simply a dream, come true. lt is also a valable tool for helping vegans manufacture EPA that so many struggle with.


>
> Do you think there would be a nutritional benefit
> to drying the sprouted seed after it's sprouted
> (besides have the sprouted seed in a more
> concentrated form of course)?

There would be a nutritional benefit of course, but it is better to have water based foods because the electromagnetic vibration is better. Living water based foods are better than dehydrated foods.

>
> Thanks!

l hope this helps.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Tamukha ()
Date: November 20, 2011 09:49AM

The Sproutarian Man,

Quote

Depends on the weather, but l generally sprout them for 14 days. l soak them for 6 hours and then spread them out evenly on a cloth laid over a tray. l then spray with a fine mist of filtered energised water twice a day.

Do you live in a desert environment? I can assure you that if I did this in my own home environment in the Upper Midwest any time of year, I'd end up with a unique mold-riddled biosphere experiment in a tray on my counter, LOL!

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Anonymous User ()
Date: November 20, 2011 11:49AM

Would you Tam? I know when we keep a chia pet going we've got to mist it at least once a day. Not soaking mind, just not letting it get the least bit dried out. Since the roots are exposed it's so important to keep the exactly right amount of moisture happening continuously. I'm sure the terracotta vs paper towel makes a big difference too. The sprouts pull away cleaner too, no cellulose fibers to worry about ingesting.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: suncloud ()
Date: November 20, 2011 03:35PM

Hi Sproutarian Man,

Thank you for your information.

I think what you're saying is that your figures above and your statement about the oxalic acid are educated guesses. That's OK. I appreciate your clearing that up. I do think it's important to know the facts, and some day hopefully, we'll have the facts for chia.

It's possible you misunderstood my original point, and I probably should have been more clear with my opening statement. I didn't mean to say that soaking/sprouting was not beneficial. My point was (or should have been) that we could probably soak the seeds at home for as long as Sunfood soaks their seeds before they dry and grind them. If you look at their website and at the websites of other companies that sell sprouted chia powder, you will see that they are selling sprouted "seed", not sprouted greens. The seeds are "germinated" and then "milled".

In other words, they soak the chia, and then they dry it and grind it. My point is that we can soak the chia at home for the same amount of time (probably 24 hours at most), then blend it (or possibly not). We'll have a fresher product than if we pay nearly twice the cost to have someone else soak and dry and powder it.

Rzman and Sproutarian, Navitas provides a USDA label online that includes the calcium and iron content of their chia. You will see that the powdered chia has less nutrients than the original seed. Of course, when we buy more highly processed foods (as in redrying and grinding), we always lose nutrients. Whatever nutrient value was gained from sprouting (meaning soaking before grinding) can be matched by us at home if we soak for the same amount of time. We then won't lose the nutrients lost by redrying and grinding.

Nutrient label for 2 tbsp (15 g) of chia seed (calcium: 10%, iron: 8%, vitamin C: 4%, fiber 24%, fat: 7%, calories 70) [www.navitasnaturals.com]

Nutrient label for 3 tbsp (15 g) of sprouted chia powder (calcium: 8%, iron: 4%, Vitamin C: 0%, fat: 7%, calories: 80)
[www.navitasnaturals.com]

The only things we know are higher for the chia powder are the calories and the price (possibly the potassium, which isn't huge).



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 11/20/2011 03:49PM by suncloud.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: THeSt0rm ()
Date: November 20, 2011 04:50PM

well as for the comment about it losing the fatty acids, that sucks lol.

I thought it would stay the same. Perhaps during the sprouting process some of the fatty acids are used up as a source of ATP for the sprouting process? Maybe you just meant in terms of the density there wouldn't be the same amount of fat.

I mean obviously, a tbslp of sprouted chia wouldn't have the same as a tblspoon of unsprouted chia since a tblsp of sprouted chia might have more leafy matter.

But what if you had a tblsp of chia, which you sprouted and and turned into like 1 cup of sprouts. Consuming that one cup of chia, wouldn't it have the same amount of the fatty acids present as the beginning 1 tblsp of unsprouted chia?

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: suncloud ()
Date: November 20, 2011 06:01PM

St0rm,

I think the short answer to your last question is no.

My understanding is this: seeds have more fatty acids (contained in the endosperm or equivalent) so they can supply the high-powered fuel needed for germination (and a little ways beyond germination).

Once plants become seedlings, they no longer need their endosperm fuels because they develop the capacity for photosynthesis, plus they have roots. That's why mature plants generally have less fats than their seeds.

Fatty acids, including omega-3 fatty acids, are the fatty part of the fats in plants and animals. Plants and animals use these fats as fuels, but also for structural components, and for many essential functions.

So yes, the seed has more omega-3 and other fatty acids than the seedling or the mature plant, because fatty acids in the seeds are used up for fuel during the germination process. Some fatty acids are still present, even in mature plants.

Here's a link on endosperm if you're interested:

[en.wikipedia.org]



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 11/20/2011 06:06PM by suncloud.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: marsh ()
Date: November 20, 2011 06:32PM

Maybe there are 2 different foods here that we're talking about:
Chia sprouts and soaked chia seeds-

They seem to have distinct differences/benefits. Think there's any truth to that idea? Or is one form of chia simply just better than the other?

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: THeSt0rm ()
Date: November 20, 2011 06:51PM

well there's also chia greens vs chia sprouts/germinated chia seed tongue sticking out smiley.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/20/2011 06:56PM by THeSt0rm.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: suncloud ()
Date: November 20, 2011 06:57PM

Yes, I think you're correct Marsh and St0rm. This thread started with rzman's question about sprouted chia powder. My understanding from reading the info on this product is that "sprouted" chia powder is actually chia seed that's been soaked until it undergoes germination, and then it's ground into a powder. It's not in the seedling stage that we normally think of as "sprouts".

They should probably call it "germinated" chia powder instead of "sprouted" chia powder to avoid the confusion.

Some companies put almonds and brazil nuts through a similar process. They're soaked, then dried, then packaged and sold. Their label says they're "sprouted"; and they are, but only for long enough to germinate, not for long enough to form an actual "sprout".

And I also think you're correct that there are distinct benefits in different forms.

One thing I wonder about a nut or seed that's been sprouted and then dried, like an almond for instance. Would it sprout again? I.e., is it still a live food? Of course, that's a different issue, but possibly relevant to the thread for some people.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 11/20/2011 07:04PM by suncloud.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: rzman10001 ()
Date: November 20, 2011 06:58PM

Thanks all, there is some really good info here. I buy the powdered because I am very weak, so it makes it easier on me. I am really glad that suncloud pointed out that these are sprouted chia seed, and not greens.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: suncloud ()
Date: November 20, 2011 07:07PM

Sorry rzman I didn't find a less expensive product for you. Hope you're feeling better soon!

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Janabanana ()
Date: December 02, 2011 12:47PM

If you don't want to drink the soak water, put it on the garden, the mucus acts to hold water in the soil. Buckwheat sprouting does the same thing.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Living Food ()
Date: February 22, 2012 12:50PM

The Sproutarian Man Wrote: Some plants have zinc increase 200%, but others like alfalfa have zinc increase 400%.
-------------------------------------------------------

How can sprouting seeds increase their mineral content? I heard this before too, but don't see how it is possible...vitamin and phytonutrient levels can go up when a seed sprouts because they are made of basic elements like carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, etc, elements that are just being rearranged in the sprout...but how do sprouts actually increase the amounts of some of these elements (minerals) over the unsprouted seeds?

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Tamukha ()
Date: February 23, 2012 10:56AM

Living Food,

I think he means that the bioavailability fo those minerals increases by x percent through sprouting.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Living Food ()
Date: February 23, 2012 06:01PM

That would make sense, but I have also heard from other sources that the actual mineral levels in sprouted seeds increase, and was hoping if anyone could give me an explanation for that. Maybe I just misinterpreted the information.

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Re: Sprouted Chia Seed?
Posted by: Tamukha ()
Date: February 23, 2012 08:06PM

I have never heard that, as it doesn't make sense--minerals are uptaken from soil or other growing medium. This only makes sense if the sprouts are grown in trace mineral solution or Azomite or something.

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