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BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: anonymous ()
Date: May 10, 2013 10:13PM

Hi,

what is the best sunblock available in RAw form? I read that sesame oil is good? but is that enough?


or any product out there I can buy? preferably in europe?


thanks smiling smiley

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: rzman10001 ()
Date: May 11, 2013 02:36AM

Here is one I found for you but it is not in the europe.
[www.rawbotanicals.com]

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: anonymous ()
Date: May 11, 2013 07:34AM

yeah.. i saw a couple on the net but not in europe... sad smiley(( does whole foods sell them? there is a whole foods in england.. smiling smiley))

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Jgunn ()
Date: May 11, 2013 07:59AM

A good light cotton shirt and wide brimmed floppy hat smiling smiley

...Jodi, the banana eating buddhist

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Anonymous User ()
Date: May 11, 2013 03:22PM

Good answer Jo!
Yup, shade, sun hat, light cotton clothes. Best sunburn prevention is a bit of a tan. As for sunscreen, I do use it because we spend a great deal of time outside and hands, feet, necks and faces are always exposed to some degree. There are lots of recipes online for making your own and the ingredients should be readily available everywhere. I use a commercial brand from France on my face because I'm 40 and would like to resist an aligator skin complexion in later years, lol. It's not entirely natural but it's one of the very few products I use that isn't so I don't mind.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: rzman10001 ()
Date: May 11, 2013 05:16PM

I agree with covering up I do not use sunbock.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: michelemm ()
Date: May 11, 2013 08:43PM

I too have been wondering about this. I prefer not to wear sunscreen, but definitely do not want my face to look oldsmiling smiley

Seems like all sunblocks always make me feel like I can't breathe. Just my opinion.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: banana who ()
Date: May 11, 2013 11:22PM

Well, maybe it's because I have olive-colored skin but I never fear the Sun. I would be more afraid of blocking it out.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: michelemm ()
Date: May 12, 2013 01:59AM

banana who Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Well, maybe it's because I have olive-colored skin
> but I never fear the Sun. I would be more afraid
> of blocking it out.


Nice perspective. Sun is GOOD for us and healthy.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Chrilyner ()
Date: May 12, 2013 02:16PM

I mostly just use wearing clothing to block the sun. However, I read about using coconut oil as a low SPF (somewhere in the vicinity of 8SPF) sunscreen. I have used it and it seemed to work fine, but you do need to be sure you put it on with plenty of time before you will be out in the sun. The general rule is if the oil makes your skin shiny, it hasn't soaked in yet and will instead just cause you to burn. If it is a matte finish, so it has soaked in, you will have SPF protection. Again, not sure if it actually works, but I am very fair-skinned and used it with no issues after over an hour of sun exposure.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: banana who ()
Date: May 12, 2013 10:40PM

I don't tend to burn and have never feared the Sun. I never heard about Vitamin D growing up--no one seemed to worry about getting enough of it. I blame sunblock SPF 1249 for this. I can understand those who are fair-skinned not wanting to broil but perhaps just being out during off-hours (before 11 am and after 4 pm) would be a good compromise. In the summer (especially at the beach where there tends to not be enough shade), it's more pleasant later anyway!

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Jgunn ()
Date: May 13, 2013 01:41AM

a few years ago i was low in vit. d and my GP asked me if i wore sunglasses all the time and ironically i did .. almost year round (i have Uvitis and am sensitive light quite often) .. he said take them off .. vit. d sythensises through the eyes quicker then the skin

i have never to this day been able to find any medical study to back this up in any way or any theory so i have no idea where he got his info from

all i can guess is maybe he was into sungazing?

if anyone can find anything to back this id be happy to see it smiling smiley

...Jodi, the banana eating buddhist

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: jalanutan ()
Date: May 13, 2013 02:17AM

I prefer to use a sun block which included a 'zinc' componate rather than solely chemical ingrediants which I've been told can actually cause skin problems.

Jalan


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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Living Food ()
Date: May 13, 2013 03:11AM

Quote

i have never to this day been able to find any medical study to back this up in any way or any theory so i have no idea where he got his info from

Unfortunately neither have I. There is abundant evidence that getting sunlight through the eyes has a wide variety of health benefits, but I have yet to find any study "proving" that you can synthesis vitamin d through the eyes. Which doesn't necessarily mean you can't.

Just one example of a scientific paper talking about the benefit of sunlight exposure via the eyes (lots of research has been done on sunlight, artificial light, and melatonin, serotonin, and circadian rhythms):

Quote

Sunglasses may further limit the eyes’ access to full sunlight, thereby altering melatonin rhythms. Going shades-free in the daylight, even for just 10–15 minutes, could confer significant health benefits.
[Mead MN. Benefits of Sunlight: A Bright Spot for Human Health. Environ Health Perspect. 2008;116(4):A161–A167.]

Also from the same study (very important): "For this reason, it’s important that people who work indoors get outside periodically, and moreover that we all try to sleep in total darkness. This can have a major impact on melatonin rhythms and can result in improvements in mood, energy, and sleep quality."

There are benefits to be had from sun exposure, and especially from sun exposure through the eyes, that go far beyond what science currently recognizes and accepts. Sungazing is a very powerful and beneficial practice, but please do some research first and only do it during the safe time periods.

So ultimately, even if there isn't any scientific evidence that the eyes can synthesize vitamin d from sun exposure, there are still many many advantages to not wearing sunglasses. If you need something to protect your eyes, it is much better to use a hat with a visor.

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I prefer to use a sun block which included a 'zinc' componate rather than solely chemical ingrediants which I've been told can actually cause skin problems.

Indeed they can. Many are proven carcinogens. But even sunscreens that don't have as many carcinogens still clog your pores and so inhibit your ability to eliminate toxins from your body. If you must use sunscreen, use coconut oil, which is actually beneficial (it's possible that the coconut oil is irradiated by the sun and so produces extra vitamin d above and beyond what your skin would normally have produced). Better yet is to build up your tolerance to the sun slowly until you can stay in the sun for hours without burning. Even fair-skinned people can achieve this by eating a pure diet very rich in antioxidants, and just being very healthy in general. If all else fails, cover up with clothing. But never wear artificial sunscreen.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Jgunn ()
Date: May 13, 2013 03:17AM

cool Living Food .. i think there is some merit to what my doctor said i just cant find any back up info on it. its probably a really understood underresearched area smiling smiley

...Jodi, the banana eating buddhist

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Living Food ()
Date: May 13, 2013 03:25AM

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I prefer not to wear sunscreen, but definitely do not want my face to look old

Again, for those who are very healthy this is not an issue at all. The sun is GOOD for you. The wrinkling that people experience is because the sunlight is drawing toxins out of your body. Those who aren't suffering from toxic overload, won't experience it.

Here's a post I made on another forum about sunlight, which some of you may find interesting:

"I've been saying for a long time that humans can live solely on sunlight and cosmic radiation, and it seems science is finally catching up.


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Call them the Hulk bugs. Just as they do for the comic book hero, gamma rays*seem to make certain microscopic fungi stronger. Researchers have found hints that melanin--the same pigment that's the natural ultraviolet filter in people's skin--might enable these fungi to harness the energy of gamma radiation as well as to shield themselves from it.

Microbiologist Arturo Casadevall of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City recalls learning several years ago that single-cell fungi had been found thriving inside the collapsed nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, Ukraine. He and his colleagues later saw reports that the cooling water in some working nuclear reactors turns black from colonies of melanin-rich fungi.

Nuclear reactors are intense sources of gamma rays, which can zap through living organisms and leave behind trails of destruction. Many microorganisms can survive in extreme environments, but Casadevall thought that something more might he going on. Perhaps the fungi were growing thanks to the radiation, not in spite of it. "The thought was that biology never wastes any energy source," he says.

Casadevall says that fungi such as Cryptococcus neoformans--which causes grave infections in AIDS patients--have layers of melanin on their membranes. Melanin is rich in radicals--molecules with highly reactive unpaired electrons--that may help fend off attacks by the immune system of any organism that the fungus is trying to infect. But Casadevall wondered whether these layers might also turn gamma ray energy into a form the cell could use.

To test this hypothesis, Casadevall's team exposed colonies of C. neoformans to gamma rays 500 times as intense as the normal radiation background on Earth's surface. The colonies grew up to three times as fast as normal. A mutant "albino" form of the fungus, which produced no melanin, grew at a normal pace, the team reports online in PLoS ONE.

But the accelerated growth didn't prove that the fungi drew energy from the radiation, Casadevall says, so the researchers took a closer look at melanin.

In one experiment, they found that gamma rays induced a four-fold increase in melanin's ability to catalyze an oxidation-reduction reaction typical of cell metabolism.

They also tested melanin's response to gamma rays using electron spin resonance, a technique similar to nuclear magnetic resonance*spectroscopy. Gamma rays changed the distribution of unpaired electrons in the molecule, says Casadevall's Albert Einstein colleague Ekaterina Dadachova.

These findings suggest that gamma rays kick some melanin electrons into excited states, initiating a yet-unknown process that would end up producing chemical energy, Casadevall says. This might be similar to the way in which photosynthesis supplies energy to plants, he adds. He speculates that melanin might collect energy not only from gamma rays but also from lower-energy radiation such as X rays or ultraviolet rays. "I think this is only the tip of the iceberg," he says.

The findings are interesting, says Darrell Fisher, a radiation biologist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory*in Richland, Wash. However, he says, "one must be careful not to draw unwarranted conclusions." If radiation enhances the growth of fungi, he says, it's "important to understand and test the underlying mechanisms."
[www.thefreelibrary.com]

It's not conclusive proof of anything, of course, but if melanin allows fungi to derive energy from gamma (and possibly other) rays, why not humans?


Quote

Pigments serve many visually obvious animal functions (e.g. hair, skin, eyes, feathers, scales). One is 'melanin', unusual in an absorption across the UV-visual spectrum which is controversial. Any polymer or macro-structure of melanin monomers is 'melanin'. Its roles derive from complex structural and physical-chemical properties e.g. semiconductor, stable radical, conductor, free radical scavenger, charge-transfer. Clinicians and researchers are well acquainted with melanin in skin and ocular pathologies and now increasingly are with internal, melanized, pathology-associated sites not obviously subject to light radiation (e.g. brain, cochlea). At both types of sites some findings puzzle: positive and negative neuromelanin effects in Parkinsons; unexpected melanocyte action in the cochlea, in deafness; melanin reduces DNA damage, but can promote melanoma; in melanotic cells, mitochondrial number was 83% less, respiration down 30%, but development similar to normal amelanotic cells. A little known, avian anatomical conundrum may help resolve melanin paradoxes. One of many unique adaptations to flight, the pecten, strange intra-ocular organ with unresolved function(s), is much enlarged and heavily melanized in birds fighting gravity, hypoxia, thirst and hunger during long-distance, frequently sub-zero, non-stop migration. The pecten may help cope with energy and nutrient needs under extreme conditions, by a marginal but critical, melanin-initiated conversion of light to metabolic energy, coupled to local metabolite recycling. Similarly in Central Africa, reduction in body hair and melanin increase may also have lead to 'photomelanometabolism' which, though small scale/ unit body area, in total may have enabled a sharply increased development of the energy-hungry cortex and enhanced human survival generally. Animal inability to utilize light energy directly has been traditionally assumed. Melanin and the pecten may have unexpected lessons also for human physiology and medicine.
[Geoffrey Goodman, Dani Bercovich. Melanin directly converts light for vertebrate metabolic use: heuristic thoughts on birds, Icarus and dark human skin. J Altern Complement Med. 2008 Jan-Feb;14(1):17-25. PMID: 18479839]

People think the sun is our enemy...no, it's our best friend. Sunlight is necessary for health - it prevents cancer, builds muscle, strengthens bones, improves immunity, improves brain function, decreases pain, the list goes on and on. Looking directly at the sun (during specific windows of time, ie the first hour of sunrise and the last hour of sunset) actually improves eyesight and in the past physicians used sunlight to cure patients of eye diseases. Sunscreen causes cancer, not the sun! Sunbathing and sun gazing are both ancient practices that have been used to successfully treat dozens of diseases, some of which confound modern medical science today (which isn't that hard...).

And I would have stopped there and disregarded the crazy notion that humans can live on sunlight, but I can't because I've seen the proof. I know a sproutarian who lives on green sprout juices and algae (virtually no calories at all) until dinner time and then he has a small bowl of sesame sprouts, and he's gaining muscle! Then there's another sproutarian who's lived on a handful of lentil sprouts a day for years and he bike rides 30 miles a day and is in great health, and another very spiritual man who only eats four almonds a day! All of these people are thriving, have boundless energy, and have great bloodwork. There are a few thousand people worldwide who never eat or drink anything but only live off prana/cosmic radiation, and science has documented it.

One example is this man (http://news.nationalpost.com/2010/05/10/indian-man-survives-without-food-and-water-baffles-doctors/), who went 15 days without food or water under strict observation and didn't eat, drink, or use the bathroom during that time, but suffered no ill effects at all! Needless to say this is impossible according to mainstream science. He claims to have not eaten any food or water for 70 years."

It's hilarious how conventional science is always coming out with "shocking new discoveries!!!!" that are not only things that have been known since ancient times (when man was wiser and more in tume with himself and the universe), but which are absurdly obvious to those with even a modicum of spirituality and consciousness.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/13/2013 03:27AM by Living Food.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: Living Food ()
Date: May 13, 2013 03:31AM

Quote

its probably a really understood underresearched area

Of course it is. You think Big Pharma's going to fund that kind of research? It's the same problem as with many other natural remedies.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: jalanutan ()
Date: May 14, 2013 12:21AM

I'm all for building up tolerance slowly, though the face is very prone to sunburn for some reason. Perhaps the facial skin is more sensitive, and I'm very conscious of using hats and sunies when out, and standing in the shade for a chat rather than in the sun. It's precautions like these that really make a difference, and all it really is, is awareness.
But when swimming, I use a skin coloured zinc compound for those prominate areas like the nose, lips, ears and just below and above the eyes.

jalan


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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: jlbff ()
Date: May 14, 2013 02:46AM

Heard raspberry oil is good.

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Re: BEST Sunblock????
Posted by: jalanutan ()
Date: May 14, 2013 06:16AM

jlbff, have you tried it yourself? If so, how effective is it? But thx for the tip.

Jalan


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