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Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Avocadess ()
Date: March 09, 2018 03:08PM

I like to make a chia pudding with coconut milk and berries. My question is this: should I grind the chia or is it preferable to leave the seeds whole within the pudding? (I would not actually grind them, but by adding to the blender that would grind them up.)

I prefer NOT grinding them, but I heard someone say they could get stuck in the intestines -- and another person say they might just go back out of me without imparting all their nutrition.

"Things that are true, things that are honest, things that are just, things that are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, things that are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things."– Philippians 4:8

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Avocadess ()
Date: March 09, 2018 08:45PM

Well, I am probably worrying over nothing. I'm trying it this time without grinding them!

I made homemade coconut milk using organic coconut flakes and water in the Blentech, straining out through a nutmilk bag -- then added a cup or two of frozen blueberries, a little vanilla extract, a pinch of salt and 1-2 TBL honey and blended. Then I put it all in a dish that has a plastic lid and stirred in the chia seeds along with dehydrated cranberries. Will be trying this in the morning!

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Tai ()
Date: March 09, 2018 11:11PM

The chia should be soaked overnight to expand fully. If you can't wait for full expansion, then grinding is better than leaving whole.

The sproutarian man grows chia grass and juices it. That is the ultimate expansion but a minimum 24 hour soak is better absorbed than a few hours.

Sometimes I grind chia as a substitute for flax meal as a binder.

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: March 11, 2018 05:44PM

Quote
Tai
The chia should be soaked overnight to expand fully. If you can't wait for full expansion, then grinding is better than leaving whole.

The sproutarian man grows chia grass and juices it. That is the ultimate expansion but a minimum 24 hour soak is better absorbed than a few hours.

Sometimes I grind chia as a substitute for flax meal as a binder.


How much water per cup?

www.phytopanacea.com

Phyto (of a plant; relating to plants)
Panacea (a solution or remedy for all difficulties or diseases)

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Tai ()
Date: March 12, 2018 04:53PM

Jtp:
How much water per cup?

Tai:
For what? To make a chia pudding? Not much, a few heaping tablespoons of chia in a quart jar. It depends on how thick you want it. Then add water about 3/4 full.

By the way, I add a little chopped fruit over night when I soak my chia, because the fruit causes friction when you stir the chia and it absorbs water faster that way. Just a little chopped banana or chopped apple is fine.

This is how my chia pudding looks. I don't eat only chia pudding. I make a fruit salad with it. There are a bunch of rose petals and fruit stirred in. That was pure delight to eat.

[www.youtube.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 03/12/2018 05:01PM by Tai.

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Avocadess ()
Date: March 15, 2018 03:31PM

Thanks, Thai!

I soaked it for half an hour or so and then put it in the frig and didn't eat it for a day. Does that count as soaking it 24 hours?

I like mine really thick (about 1/3 cup chia for each cup of water or liquid). Then after it is ready to eat, if I have any dried fruits (which I happen to have dried cranberries) I stir them in and in a little time they become plump and soft and are nice in my current blueberry-coconut milk pudding.

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Prana ()
Date: March 15, 2018 05:00PM

I do both with my chia seeds. For pudding, I use them whole. But as a thickener for my salad dressings, I grind them.


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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Avocadess ()
Date: March 15, 2018 08:54PM

Thanks, Prana.

Oh, by the way I gave the wrong ingredient amounts in my "recipe" above. I should have said 2/3 cup chia to 3 cups liquid (because I like it thick). I really think that 1/3 cup for each cup would be too too thick!

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: John Rose ()
Date: March 20, 2018 09:29AM

Snippets from my file on Chia Seeds...

One of the unique qualities of the chia seed is its ability to absorb more than 9 times its volume in water or other liquid.

The fast and easy way to take Chia seed is to add one tablespoon Chia seed into an 8 ounce glass of water or juice, stir to break up any lumps, let sit about 5 minutes, stir again and then drink.

How to make Chia Gel (9 to 1 ratio) - Put water in a sealable plastic container and slowly pour seed into the water then mix with a wire whisk or fork. This process will avoid any clumping of the seed. Wait a few minutes and stir again to break up any clumps, let stand 10 minutes, stir again. Then store up to two weeks in the refrigerator.

Chia Gel can be added to jams, jellies, peanut butter, milkshakes, nut spreads, smoothies, hot or cold cereals, yogurts, mustard, catsup, tarter sauce, BBQ sauces, etc. as a fat replacer, for energy and endurance or for added great taste (the gel has just a slight nutty flavor). Add the Chia Gel, between 50 to 70 percent by volume to any of the above mentioned foods, mix well and taste. You will notice a very smooth texture with the integrity of the flavor intact and have added 50 to 70 percent more volume to your food and have displaced calories and fat by incorporating an ingredient that is 90 percent water!

Chia Gel causes a slow release of carbohydrates and an equally slow converting of carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar) for energy. The outer lay of chia seeds is rich in mucilloid soluble fiber. This mucillois is intended to keep the seeds from drying out in the arid desert air. When chia seeds are mixed with water or stomach juices, a gel forms that creates a physical barrier between the carbohydrates and the digestive enzymes that break them down. The carbohydrates are digested eventually but at a slow and uniform rate. There is no insulin surge or spike needed to lower the blood sugar level after eating chia.

Other benefits of Chia gel included: Helping to control weight - mixed with orange or other fruit juice the gel-like seeds make a nutritious breakfast that leaves one feeling full and without hunger until noon.

Aztec warriors would eat chia during hunting trips and the Indians of the Southwest would eat only chia seed mixed with water as they ran from the Colorado River to the Pacific Ocean to trade products.

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Posted by: Avocadess ()
Date: March 31, 2018 01:14PM

Thank you, John Rose!

I'm loving my chia seed puddings! My current favorite is chocolate, which I make by adding cacao powder, vanilla and a little honey (plus pinch of salt). Yum. That's all with my homemade coconut milk.

And I DO want at least 1/3 cup chia seeds per cup of liquid, sometimes more.

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Re: Chia Seeds -- To Grind Or Not To Grind
Date: April 27, 2018 02:28AM

Quote
Tai
The chia should be soaked overnight to expand fully. If you can't wait for full expansion, then grinding is better than leaving whole.

The sproutarian man grows chia grass and juices it. That is the ultimate expansion but a minimum 24 hour soak is better absorbed than a few hours.

Sometimes I grind chia as a substitute for flax meal as a binder.

Always best to sprout the chia if possible. Why? Because the soaked chia has low protein absorption, + sprouting it improves the taste and adds vitamins and phytochemicals and makes it generally more absorbable.

If you can't sprout l would definitely be grinding it in a slow rotating device to make it more absorbable and then soak. Even better would be to soak the ground chia in rejuvalic for a couple of hours to make it taste more creamy and enhance the digestion and nutrition and then make your pudding.

Soaked chia doesn't cut it IMO. Sprouting or grinding is important.

www.thesproutarian.com

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