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Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: October 02, 2019 11:34PM

[www.techexplorist.com]

"Scientists analyzed the effect of cooking on the microbiomes of mice by feeding diets of raw meat, cooked meat, fresh sweet potatoes, or cooked sweet potatoes to groups of animals — selected because prior data demonstrated that cooking alters the nutrients and other bioactive mixes in both meat and tubers.

Scientists were surprised to know that raw versus cooked meat had no detectable impact on the animals’ gut microbes. Interestingly, raw and cooked sweet potatoes altogether changed the composition of the animals’ microbiomes, just as microbes’ patterns of gene activity and the biologically critical metabolic items they delivered.

The specialists affirmed their findings are utilizing an increasingly different array of vegetables, performing what Turnbaugh called a “mad scientists experiment” – sustaining the mice an assortment of raw and cooked sweet potato, white potato, corn, peas, carrots, and beets.

The group attributed the microbial changes they saw to two key factors: cooked food allows the host to soak up more calories in the small intestine, leaving less for hungry microbes further down the gut; on the other hand, many raw foods contain potent antimicrobial compounds that appear to damage certain bacteria directly."

This is direct evidence against the consumption of cooked foods due to how crucial the microbiome is. Is this the beginning of science proving raw is law?

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Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/02/2019 11:34PM by jtprindl.

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: RawPracticalist ()
Date: October 03, 2019 11:52PM

>Scientists were surprised to know that raw versus cooked meat had no detectable impact on the animals’ gut microbes

Because ...

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: John Rose ()
Date: October 04, 2019 12:12PM

[www.nature.com]
Letter Published: 30 September 2019
Cooking shapes the structure and function of the gut microbiome

Abstract
Diet is a critical determinant of variation in gut microbial structure and function, outweighing even host genetics1,2,3. Numerous microbiome studies have compared diets with divergent ingredients1,2,3,4,5, but the everyday practice of cooking remains understudied.

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: October 05, 2019 07:50PM

Quote
John Rose
[www.nature.com]
Letter Published: 30 September 2019
Cooking shapes the structure and function of the gut microbiome

Abstract
Diet is a critical determinant of variation in gut microbial structure and function, outweighing even host genetics1,2,3. Numerous microbiome studies have compared diets with divergent ingredients1,2,3,4,5, but the everyday practice of cooking remains understudied.

Wow, awesome study and it just was published too. We all knew science would catch up to the benefits of a raw food diet one day. Glad to see this process coming to fruition.

www.phytopanacea.squarespace.com

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: Mislu ()
Date: October 31, 2019 07:13PM

Thank you for posting. I need to see more of this. Too many distractions for what seems obvious.... yet so much criticism against raw. There was some “debunking raw” program from bbc. I don’t buy it. They didn’t even do “ study” on a live person. Just on a mechanical digestion machine. Compared Cooke potatoes verses raw. Yet came to conclusion humans poorly digest raw foods. No test on melon, cherries , lettuce.... or anything else? I hate to suggest but they didn’t even run or show results of cooked or raw meat. Probably would be too unpleasant for most viewers? But you would not believe how many people believe that’s proof.

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: November 19, 2019 06:50PM

Quote
Mislu
Thank you for posting. I need to see more of this. Too many distractions for what seems obvious.... yet so much criticism against raw. There was some “debunking raw” program from bbc. I don’t buy it. They didn’t even do “ study” on a live person. Just on a mechanical digestion machine. Compared Cooke potatoes verses raw. Yet came to conclusion humans poorly digest raw foods. No test on melon, cherries , lettuce.... or anything else? I hate to suggest but they didn’t even run or show results of cooked or raw meat. Probably would be too unpleasant for most viewers? But you would not believe how many people believe that’s proof.

The fewer nutrients we absorb because food is raw means there is more nutrients left to feed our gut bacteria, which is actually beneficial. But yeah, if you're going to test the digestibility of raw foods, don't cherry-pick a food that raw foodists rarely eat. Use fruits and vegetables. Juicing solve any bioavailability issues, though.

www.phytopanacea.squarespace.com

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: December 09, 2019 02:08AM

[www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com]: Here is a breakdown of the study, and it's actually BAD news for raw...

For instance, raw and cooked versions of the same foods affected the gut microbiome differently in mice. While raw and cooked lean beef had a similar impact on the gut microbiome, the mice gut microbiome responded differently when the animals were fed raw and cooked sweet potatoes. Consuming raw sweet potatoes led to lower within-subject diversity, a higher expression of genes and enzymes for metabolizing starch, sugar and xenobiotics, and altered metabolic byproducts when compared with cooked-fed mice.

By feeding the mice controlled diets with different raw and cooked low- and high-starch foods—including sweet potato, white potato, corn, peas, carrots, and beets—the authors confirmed that gut microorganisms were sensitive to starch digestibility.

Thus, starchy foods with a high amount of low-digestibility starch when raw (sweet potato and white potato) led to the most profound changes in gut microbial community structure. However, low-starch foods (carrot and beet) or foods with a high amount of high-digestibility starch when raw (corn and peas) led to almost undetectable changes in gut microbes.

Cooked foods were mainly digested and absorbed in the small intestine (thus, processed by host enzymes), whereas raw foods reached the colon, where they had detrimental effects on microbes, attributable to antimicrobial compounds.

By quantifying microbial cell damage in gut samples, Carmody and colleagues found that the mice fed raw tubers had the same extent of microbial cell damage as the mice group treated with the oral antibiotic ampicillin.

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: Jennifer ()
Date: December 09, 2019 02:33AM

Yes, you're right about the digestibility of starches. I've read about it previously and always wanted to try the SCD (specific carbohydrate) Diet, but never did. Even now that I've been having a digestion issue, I still didn't try avoiding polysaccharides.

[www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info]

************

SCIENCE BEHIND THE DIET

[www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info]

The Diet

"The Specific Carbohydrate Diet™ is based on the principle that specifically selected carbohydrates, requiring minimal digestive processes, are well absorbed and leave virtually none to be used for furthering microbial overgrowth in the intestine. As the microbial population decreases due to lack of food, its harmful byproducts also decrease, freeing the intestinal surface of injurious substances. No longer needing protection, the mucus-producing cells stop producing excessive mucus, and carbohydrate digestion is improved. Malabsorption is replaced by absorption. As the individual absorbs energy and nutrients, all the cells in the body are properly nourished, including the cells of the immune system, which then can assist in overcoming the microbial invasion." The simpler the structure of the carbohydrate, the more easily the body digests and absorbs it. Monosaccharides (single molecules of glucose, fructose, or galactose) require no splitting by digestive enzymes in order to be absorbed by the body. These are the sugars we rely on in the diet. They include those found in fruits, honey, some vegetables, and in yoghurt.

Double sugar molecules (disaccharides: lactose, sucrose, maltose and isomaltose) and starches (polysaccharides) are primarily avoided on the diet. Some starches have been shown to be tolerated, particularly those in the legume family (dried beans, lentils and split peas only). However, they must be soaked for 10-12 hours prior to cooking, and the water discarded since it will contain other sugars which are indigestible, but which are removed in the soaking process. Small amounts of legumes may only be added to the diet after about three months. The starches in all grains, corn, and potatoes must be strictly avoided."

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: fresh ()
Date: December 09, 2019 02:57AM

Tubers and mice
Resulting in x proves nothing

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: December 09, 2019 03:25AM

Quote
Jennifer
Yes, you're right about the digestibility of starches. I've read about it previously and always wanted to try the SCD (specific carbohydrate) Diet, but never did. Even now that I've been having a digestion issue, I still didn't try avoiding polysaccharides.

[www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info]

************

SCIENCE BEHIND THE DIET

[www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info]

The Diet

"The Specific Carbohydrate Diet™ is based on the principle that specifically selected carbohydrates, requiring minimal digestive processes, are well absorbed and leave virtually none to be used for furthering microbial overgrowth in the intestine. As the microbial population decreases due to lack of food, its harmful byproducts also decrease, freeing the intestinal surface of injurious substances. No longer needing protection, the mucus-producing cells stop producing excessive mucus, and carbohydrate digestion is improved. Malabsorption is replaced by absorption. As the individual absorbs energy and nutrients, all the cells in the body are properly nourished, including the cells of the immune system, which then can assist in overcoming the microbial invasion." The simpler the structure of the carbohydrate, the more easily the body digests and absorbs it. Monosaccharides (single molecules of glucose, fructose, or galactose) require no splitting by digestive enzymes in order to be absorbed by the body. These are the sugars we rely on in the diet. They include those found in fruits, honey, some vegetables, and in yoghurt.

Double sugar molecules (disaccharides: lactose, sucrose, maltose and isomaltose) and starches (polysaccharides) are primarily avoided on the diet. Some starches have been shown to be tolerated, particularly those in the legume family (dried beans, lentils and split peas only). However, they must be soaked for 10-12 hours prior to cooking, and the water discarded since it will contain other sugars which are indigestible, but which are removed in the soaking process. Small amounts of legumes may only be added to the diet after about three months. The starches in all grains, corn, and potatoes must be strictly avoided."

Interesting! I'll have to look into it more. However, galactose is pro-aging so I'd avoid that as much as possible.

www.phytopanacea.squarespace.com

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Re: Gut Microbiome: Raw versus Cooked
Posted by: jtprindl ()
Date: December 09, 2019 03:40AM

However, in studies where galactose is used to induce aging, it's injected subcutaneously so unlikely that the same effects apply to ingestion.

www.phytopanacea.squarespace.com

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