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The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 16, 2022 12:56AM

You hear many people say that the circadian rhythm is very important. That you were born with circadian rhythm and that it is like it is. But that is just an easy fabrication made up to look like the rise of the waves with the moon. There is a better explanation. When you wake up, it is not from your circadian rhythm. It is cortisol. Cortisol comes up when the blood glucose is bellow a certain level. This allows for muscle breakdown to make more glucose and keep your brain alive.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Horsea ()
Date: May 16, 2022 04:57PM

When you wake up, it is not from your circadian rhythm. It is cortisol. Cortisol comes up when the blood glucose is bellow a certain level. This allows for muscle breakdown to make more glucose and keep your brain alive.


We should not allow our blood glucose to ever get that low. Maybe there is something to the idea of a bedtime snack, ie, so that you aren't hungry as a bear when you wake up the next morning with low blood glucose and ready to fight with anyone nearby.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 16, 2022 08:16PM

You can do something about it. Actually, the human brain came about from eating fruit. I don't mean to eat only fruit (not from being a fruitarian. The brain requires fructose but on a demand basis. If you exceed it, then it metabolizes on fat (fatty liver) and triglycerides, which will be bad on thelong term. To make it perfect, you have to account went you ate last before sleep with the purpose of having around 60-70 grams of glycogen in the liver (the liver is the only source of energy for the brain). Fructose converts to 100% glycogen when combine with glucose at a 50/50 ratio. So if you eat a fruit juice with 50/50 before sleep then you are set. But it cannot make you energetic. You want to only fill up the glycogen. People that follow a no carb diet are going straight to mental damage (inferno). Glucose diet (starches) are only good for muscle glycogen replenishment. It is bad for the brain (high insulin, resistance, etc). Fructose has no insulin response but converts to 100% glycogen if amount does not exceed liver limit.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/16/2022 08:19PM by Panchito.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 16, 2022 09:01PM

We are two animals in one. Each of the two animals have a different diet. One of the animals does not exist in nature and cannot be compared with another animal. The first animal is the body. The second animal grew on top of the first (on top of the brain stem) and it is the cortex. The second animal feeds from the liver of the first animal. So you have to have two different diets. One to feed the animal and the second to feed the top of the brain. When you read this, the second animal is reading.

To feed the second animal, you need to feed the first a supplement. The supplement is made of fructose and glucose (fruit). Every time you eat a meal, you need to eat fruit to keep the bird happy. But it would be a mistake to think that the first animal requires 100% fruit. It is only the second animal that requires the fruit. It is like feeding a bird inside you.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 16, 2022 09:53PM

To summarize, the brain is energetically 100% fruitarian. The body is not. If the brain uses 20% of the energy, then it could be said that humans are approximately 20% fruitarians.

In a 2200 calorie diet, 20% = 440 calories. Divide 400/3 (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) and you get about 150 calories (a 1.5 banana). Then the max liver capacity for glycogen is about 80 grams after which it is metabolized in fat/trigs. Well a banana may not have much fructose but you get the idea. YOu want fruits with fructose already available.

40 grams of glucose + 40 grams of fructose = 80 grams of liver glycogen (brain food)

A quick look up reveals that:

An orange has 2.25 grams of fructose. So you would need 17 oranges to get liver limit (without counting sucrose which needs an enzyme) but it has excess glucose or sucrose.

One banana has 5.72 grams of fructose. You need 7 bananas for max liver capacity.

kiwi has 4.35 grams per 100 grams.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 16, 2022 10:03PM

The glycogen in the liver is like a sand clock. It depletes with time to maintain a constant blood glucose level. Three meals in 24 hours

24/3 = 8 hours

8 hours = 80 grams of glycogen (approx). This approximation gives 10 grams per hour (it is probably half during sleep).

So you have a daily rate of 10 grams of liver glycogen per hour and from there you could make your calculations.

It kind of make sense that the first animal was an ape because of the fruit requirements of the brain demands and the glycogen.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Horsea ()
Date: May 17, 2022 12:26AM

Well, Panchito, you have obviously studied all this. But most of us need easy to grasp advice on what to eat just before bed so that we feel good when we get up. I have to have protein, so what am I doing wrong.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 17, 2022 02:25AM

Aminoacids from protein also converts to glycogen in the liver.

A possible guess would be hempseed milk with some sweetener (tsp honey). Find an amount that does not make too energetic. You need the sweetener to release tryptophan. Liquid should be better than solid for sleep (no digestion).

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 17, 2022 09:45PM

Ok here is a little explanation. Hempseeds has lots of the aminoacid glycine. Glycine promotes sleep. The sweetener then releases serotonin (neurotransmitter made from tryptophan). Then serotonin makes melatonin.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Horsea ()
Date: May 18, 2022 12:45AM

Is this about promoting sleep or having good level of blood sugar when you wake up in the morning? Me, I fall asleep without any difficulty. Sleep "like a baby". smiling smiley

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 18, 2022 01:18AM

The closest juice to fill up the liver tank is probably grape juice.

Grape juice, canned or bottled, unsweetened, without added ascorbic acid
[fdc.nal.usda.gov]

Grape juice, purple, with added vitamin C, from concentrate, shelf stable
[fdc.nal.usda.gov]

Sucrose 0.04 g
Glucose 6.81 g
Fructose 7.36 g

The fructose to glucose ratio is 50/50 and there is no sucrose. It should go straight to the liver tank assuming is not top off. Only the glucose releases insulin (a little is good). The liver in theory would produce the most liver glycogen (food brain) from this combination. I actually never tried my self to measure but now I will.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/18/2022 01:19AM by Panchito.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 18, 2022 01:34AM

OK some practical info.

1 cup of grape juice (253 grams of juice) =

Glucose = 17.2 grams
Fructose = 18.6 grams

Total = 35.8 (close to 40 grams)

Depending on liver size the capacity could go from 60 grams to 120 grams (large person). With a normal liver glycogen capacity of 80 grams, a cup of grape juice would fill up half the tank (40 grams).

With a rate of 10 grams an hour, a cup of grape juice would last 4 hours. I am not sure of the rate during sleep but it maybe less.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/18/2022 01:38AM by Panchito.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: fresh ()
Date: May 18, 2022 12:17PM

How do wild animals figure out what to eat to live energetically?

Do they calculate sucrose?

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 18, 2022 09:26PM

Quote
fresh
How do wild animals figure out what to eat to live energetically?

Do they calculate sucrose?

That is easy. The only wild animals left are the ones that didn't die.

But the humans that go inside a supermarket to get food, they chose among thousands of products. Did you buy food in a supermarket? If so, you made a decision that is not natural.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: fresh ()
Date: May 18, 2022 10:04PM

Quote
Panchito
Quote
fresh
How do wild animals figure out what to eat to live energetically?

Do they calculate sucrose?

That is easy. The only wild animals left are the ones that didn't die.

But the humans that go inside a supermarket to get food, they chose among thousands of products. Did you buy food in a supermarket? If so, you made a decision that is not natural.

Thats irrelevant.

You can acquire food that is suitable for your nature
And act in tune with your senses.

Eat one whole food at a time like all animals do

And eat until satiated.

But you will continue to complicate matters.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 19, 2022 12:10AM

For those interested in the subject of fructose, this is an interesting study

[www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

In nature, fructose commonly occurs together with glucose

The use of mixed sugars are more metabolically predictive of dietary consequences than that from single monosaccharides studied individually, as metabolism of each type of sugar is not independent from the other (discussed below). Metabolic interactions between glucose and fructose significantly impact general sugar metabolism.

Nilsson et al. [72] reported that a significantly higher amount of glycogen was determined in the liver (274.6 mmol glycosyl unit per kg wet tissue) after fructose infusion than that (76.2 mmol glycosyl unit) after glucose infusion;

Another fructose infusion study (non-exercise) by Dirlewanger et al. [73] noted that fructose stimulates total glucose output, glucose cycling and intrahepatic UDP galactose turnover, which was used as a marker for increased glycogen synthesis.



[en.wikipedia.org]

Glycogen is the analogue of starch, a glucose polymer that functions as energy storage in plants.

In humans, glycogen is made and stored primarily in the cells of the liver and skeletal muscle.[4][5] In the liver, glycogen can make up 5–6% of the organ's fresh weight, and the liver of an adult, weighing 1.5 kg, can store roughly 100–120 grams of glycogen.[4][6]

Liver glycogen stores serve as a store of glucose for use throughout the body, particularly the central nervous system.[4] The human brain consumes approximately 60% of blood glucose in fasted, sedentary individuals.[4]

Small amounts of glycogen are also found in other tissues and cells, including the kidneys, red blood cells,[11][12][13] white blood cells,[14] and glial cells in the brain.[15] The uterus also stores glycogen during pregnancy to nourish the embryo.[16]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/19/2022 12:16AM by Panchito.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 21, 2022 10:34PM

[www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

GLYCOGEN AS A FUEL SOURCE

In addition to human muscle and liver cells, glycogen is stored in small amounts in brain cells, heart cells, smooth muscle cells, kidney cells, red and white blood cells, and even adipose cells.18 Glucose is a critical energy source for neurons in the brain and throughout the body,19 and under normal circumstances, glucose is the only fuel the brain uses to produce ATP; at rest, approximately 60% of the glucose found in blood is metabolized by the brain.20 Because the brain is an obligatory user of blood glucose, it is critical to maintain euglycemia (normal blood glucose concentration) during rest and exercise. The brain’s constant requirement for glucose is the primary factor underlying the current recommended daily allowance (RDA) for carbohydrates at 130 g/day.2

The > 80 g of glucose stored as liver glycogen is used to constantly replenish the 4 g of glucose circulating in the blood.20 To ensure the brain has an ample supply of glucose, the liver releases glucose into the bloodstream at a rate similar to the uptake of glucose from the blood into tissues, thereby stabilizing blood glucose concentration between 4.0 and 5.5 mmol/L (70–100 mg/dL). When liver glycogen stores fall to low levels, the liver can increase its reliance on gluconeogenic metabolism to produce glucose from amino acids and glycerol, although the rate of this production is limited and cannot keep pace with glucose removal from the blood during exercise. The use of muscle glycogen during exercise reduces glucose uptake from the blood, thereby helping to maintain blood glucose in the absence of exogenous carbohydrate intake. Sufficient carbohydrate ingestion during exercise helps maintain liver glycogen stores21,22 and has been reported to spare glycogen in type II (fast-twitch) muscle cells.23

In addition to the glycogen stored in muscle and liver, a small amount of glycogen is stored in brain cells (100× less than the glycogen content of muscle cells), specifically in astrocytes, nonneuronal glial cells that play an important role in stabilizing, insulating, and nourishing neurons.19,24,25 Astrocyte glycogen is metabolized to lactate, which then diffuses to nearby neurons to support their energy needs, an example of a very localized lactate shuttle.26 Lactate transporters (monocarboxylate transporter [MCT]) have been found in the neuronal membrane.24,27 Neurons also contain a small amount of glycogen.28

It is true that fructose better stimulates liver glycogen restoration and glucose does the same for muscle glycogen,104 but most physically active people normally ingest enough fructose and glucose in foods and beverages to restore liver glycogen. Consequently, there is no need to be concerned with the adequacy of dietary fructose intake.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/21/2022 10:48PM by Panchito.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 23, 2022 10:00PM

Example of early symptoms

Anxiety
Irritability
Irrational or uncontrolled behavior
Headache
Dizziness

Example of causes

Fasting
Delayed or missed meals
Exercise or weight loss without proper nutrition
Avoiding carbohydrates intentionally (fruit, etc)
Reactive hypoglycemia

Treatment: 1 cup of Grape juice


[www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]


Glucose is the metabolic fuel for the brain. Acute interruption of glucose supply may result in functional brain failure and eventually lead to coma and death. There is a possible association between repeated episodes of severe hypoglycemia and long term cognitive dysfunction. Åsvold et al., reported that the overall cognitive scores were lower in children with diabetes who had experienced severe hypoglycemic episodes than those without history of severe hypoglycemia.[46] Earlier studies also showed that severe hypoglycemia may aggravate the severity of the neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with diabetes.[47] Severe hypoglycemic episodes in older patients with diabetes have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of dementia,[48] functional brain failure[49] and cerebellar ataxia.[50] In human autopsy studies, of patients dying after an episode of severe hypoglycemia, as well as in animal models, the superficial layers of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and caudate nucleus, were reported to be affected.[51] More recently, Bree et al., reported that severe hypoglycemia causes damage in the cortex and the hippocampus regions and the extent of damage was closely correlated to the presence of seizure-like activity.[52]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/23/2022 10:04PM by Panchito.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Horsea ()
Date: May 24, 2022 04:49AM

I wonder what's meant by "purple" grapes (out of which they make juice). There's the small, strong-tasting, somewhat sour-ish ones (I've grown these and they have seeds). And then there's the other purple ones you can get in the stores but they are mild tasting and have no seeds. I would find it hard to believe that their glucose-fructose ratios would be the same.

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Re: The circadian fabrication
Posted by: Panchito ()
Date: May 24, 2022 08:42PM

The purple color (skin) is where the polyphenols are. Polyphenols taste bad (bitter) but are good.

In this case, you would want the most sugar loaded grapes. I personally tried one cup only but did not feel much difference. It was the second cup (10 minutes later) that made a decisive difference on the brain. It may have to do to reaching a threshold or something. I think it takes about 1 hour for the liver to convert two cups into glycogen but you feel it sooner on the brain.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/24/2022 08:44PM by Panchito.

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