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Is Sprout Bread Supposed To Be A Mushy Goo?
Posted by: mtravis ()
Date: April 03, 2007 10:26PM

I'm not Alice Waters, so maybe that's why my first batch of sprout bread didn't turn out so lovely. Basically, I took 2 day old wheat sprouts and ran them through my extruding juicer. Then I smeared it on a cookie sheet to about 1/4" to 1/2" thickness and put in the oven at just about the lowest temperature setting. The dial didn't register anything below 200 fahrenheit, so I'm hoping that I got the temp to 100-120. After about 90 minutes, the top of the "bread" was pretty dry. The "inside/bottom" part against the foil was mushy.

I ate some, and then scooped the rest into a baggy and then into the fridge. It wasn't very sweet as I've been led to expect, but it wasn't foul tasting.

I think that I did the sprouts right--they had about 1/4" white tendrils coming out of the seeds.

I'm just wondering if the consistency of gooey mush is what I should expect, and if not, what I should do differently.

Thanks
Mark

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Re: Is Sprout Bread Supposed To Be A Mushy Goo?
Posted by: la_veronique ()
Date: April 11, 2007 09:28AM

Mark

<<It wasn't very sweet as I've been led to expect, but it wasn't foul tasting.>>

oh my gosh that is a FUNNY thing to say Mark smiling smiley
heee hee made me laugh

i'm rollling on the floor with laughter
can't help itsmiling smiley

wha's wrong with mushy goo?
yummmmmmzeeeeiessszzz smiling smiley

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Re: Is Sprout Bread Supposed To Be A Mushy Goo?
Posted by: annex ()
Date: April 12, 2007 04:58AM

I think that is just the way it dried. I use a dehydrator, but I have to turn over stuff like that so both sides get dried.

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Re: Is Sprout Bread Supposed To Be A Mushy Goo?
Posted by: Monark ()
Date: April 12, 2007 12:54PM

Mine does that, too - just turn the whole thing over and let it dry some more on the other side - then it will be fine smiling smiley smiling smiley . I usually then slice it into cracker sizes with a pizza cutter smiling smiley smiling smiley .

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Re: Is Sprout Bread Supposed To Be A Mushy Goo?
Posted by: mtravis ()
Date: June 27, 2007 02:57AM

I've had better luck since my first experiment. For starters, I'm using a food processor instead of juicer to turn the sprouts into dough. Then I'm mixing in a couple TBSP of flour as I knead. And I'm baking at 225-250 degrees (instead of 120 or thereabouts) The result? The yummiest bread I've ever had. Right out of the oven it's better than just about any pastry that I can imagine. The small bit of flour really helps to make the dough less wet. My next batch I may try at a lower temperature so as to keep enzymes alive, but this stuff is really wonderful.

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Re: Is Sprout Bread Supposed To Be A Mushy Goo?
Posted by: mauiart ()
Date: July 14, 2007 07:50AM

If you really like dried grain sprouts the tip about the dehydrater is good esp turning them over too. Besides that, correctly growing the sprouts in the first place will also result in a superior end product. Here are some tips to growing grain sprouts with some info contrary to what you have been previously been taught about sprouting.

Grains - soak wheat berries 6 - 8 hours during a warm day and 8 - 12 hours over nite. This will prevent the grain from fermenting from the start. If you see little bubbles at the top of the soak water that's already a bad start which leads to sour sprouts. I would just toss those and begin again for the tastiest sprouts. As with all sprouting day times can be shorter than cooler overnite soaking. Overnite soaking is preferable for more successful results esp when you are a beginner. Use a plastic screen as opposed to cheese cloth for better vetilation which is also important for less fermentation and souring of sprouts. To drain, place at a downward angle, for a short while, say in a dish drainer at a 45 degree angle downward for a short period, then hold hand over screen and give a couple downward shakes over the sink to get the last amounts of water out, then lay on their side, which also helps with ventilation as opposed to leaving them upside down in the dish drainer all day and do not water for the first 24 hours. Rotate the jar the second part of the day instead of watering to redistribute the moisture already in the jar instead of a second watering each day. Rinse only one time per 24 hours and they will be done in about 2-3 days. When the tail equals the length of the seed. Living in warm Hawaii I also have to grow alfalfa this very same way.
Aloha and good luck. Let me know if this helped. MauiArt

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