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Brazilian coconut water company regrows forests
Posted by: Tai ()
Date: March 12, 2018 04:05PM

I tried some of this brazilian coconut water at a trade show. I have seen it sold in the stores, but it's a bit pricey. Yet, I just found out that they are committed to replanting forests, so I am going to support them.

The water is not as sweet as Thai coconuts, but that's actually nice. Every coconut country has unique coconut flavors.

[drinkpurebrazilian.com]
REPLENISHING THE AMAZON
ONE BOTTLE AT A TIME
Pure Brazilian has helped replenish 100s of thousands of sq. ft. with plans to plant over a million trees in the next five years.

CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL
Pure Brazilian Coconut Water is socially conscientious and determined to make a positive environmental and economic impact on the world on bottle at a time. For every bottle sold, 1 sq. ft. goes towards replenishing the Amazon Rainforest through our partnership with Conservation International. And since we’re selling cases here at drinkpb.com, that’s 12 sq. ft. for every two cases purchased with pure purpose.

Why do we care so much? For starters we’re from Brazil. Plus, Conservation International loves the Amazon as much as we do and aims to restore 73 million trees in the Amazon Rainforest by 2023. Spanning 30,000 hectares of land (about 74,000 acres), the project is the largest tropical forest restoration initiative in the world. So what are we really saying? Well when you hydrate with Pure Brazilian Coconut Water, you’re not only hydrating with the purest water on the planet, you’re helping Conservation International and Brazil fulfill their commitment to the Paris Agreement by achieving their ultimate goal of 12 million hectares by 2030. Drink up!.

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Re: Brazilian coconut water company regrows forests
Posted by: RawPracticalist ()
Date: May 07, 2018 03:10PM

>Pure Brazilian has helped replenish 100s of thousands of sq. ft. with plans to plant over a million trees in the next five years.

Really good.

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Re: Brazilian coconut water company regrows forests
Posted by: riverhousebill ()
Date: May 10, 2018 12:52AM

Pacific Lumber Co. L.P.Co. Gorgea Pacific Co. claims they replant.

Problem is you Cannot Replant a Forest.


Somethings that mother nature can do We cant.

You can do a tree farm, A forest has diversity,needs Diversity in age to survive thirty years of planting will not give you that diversity
Ive seen so many fail on the West Coast U.S.A.

You don't know what you have till its gone.

SmartNews Keeping you current
Cut Down a Forest, Let It Grow Back, And Even 30 Years Later It’s Not the Same
In the tropics, secondary forests are often “ephemeral,” succumbing to deforestation every 10 years or so and thus never able to fully recover
image: [thumbs-prod.si-cdn.com]

(Rainforest Action Network)
By Rachel Nuwer
smithsonian.com
December 13, 2013
6303116
During a recent visit in Panama, a tour guide pulled our boat up alongside a stretch of clear-cut canal bank, muddy and exposed in the tropical sun. Developers needed that tract of jungle gone—at least for the time being. “Don’t worry,” the guide told us. “It’ll grow back in a couple months. The jungle moves fast.”
In a sense, he is right: nature is quick to sprout up seedlings and shrubs after a disturbance. That tract of jungle, however, likely will never be the same. According to new research conducted along the Panama canal by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, even after enjoying 32 years in which to regrow, sections of formerly disturbed jungle never quite returned to its original glory of diversity. In fact, the researchers went to far as to label those regrown plots as relatively useless for biodiversity conservation.
The team randomly chose 45 regrown plots of forest throughout the Panama canal watershed and conducted surveys of all plant life there. The forests ranged in age from two to 32 years old. All in all, the team counted around 52,000 plants of 324 different species. Those patches that were located near still-intact old growth forests harbored higher species diversity than those that were more cut off from the original forest.
This sounds like a lot of trees are happily living in regrown patches, but the authors point out that those 324 species were not at all evenly distributed. Instead, the landscape was dominated by a few hardy pioneers. Just 7 percent of species popped up in more than half the plots, and still fewer of those species were frequently abundant.

When researchers also included trees in old growth forests, the species found in secondary forests represented just 55 percent of the total species diversity in the region. Worse still, even in the oldest plots surveyed, just half of the trees had reached reproductive maturity—they’re not playing an active role yet in reseeding the jungle.
If given enough time, the authors think, secondary forests could likely regrow, mature and become productive, especially if they are located next to prevailing stretches of old growth. However, they point out, in the tropics secondary forests are often “ephemeral,” succumbing to deforestation every 10 years or so and thus never able to fully recover.

Read more: [www.smithsonianmag.com]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 05/10/2018 12:59AM by riverhousebill.

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